LOCAL NEWS

Local News 9-23-2014


Johnson Co. School Board Meets to Discuss Tax Rate; Public on Hand to Voice Opinions

The Johnson Co. B.O.E. met Monday evening at the administration building, during a special hearing allowing the public to give their thoughts on a proposed tax rate increase from 36.9 to 56.6 cents for every hundred dollars of assessed property. School officials said this new rate was needed to help generate additional and much needed funds for the school to help offset reduced state funding. It was standing room only, as citizens showed up to voice their displeasure of the proposed tax increase. A total of 21 people spoke before the board members, begging and pleading with them to reconsider this increase, saying many residents of Johnson Co. could not afford this all at one time. Many questions were ask of the board members ranging from salaries, to sports, to set aside money the school has for construction, but the main point of emphasis was doing what's best for the students of Johnson Co. After nearly an hour and a half of facts, figures and conversation, the hearing adjourned.

After about a 20 minute recess, the regular scheduled meeting began with all board members present. During the New Business portion of the meeting, the tax rate increase was brought to the table. A proposed tax rate increase was discussed during the last school board meeting to increase the tax rate to 56.6 per $100 of assessed value and a second vote was ask for in this meeting. Board member William Fraley made a motion to increase the tax rate to the proposed 56.6, but that motion died because it lacked a second. After much discussion on what to do and allowing each board member to voice his opinion, then Doug Wright the following motion. To increase the tax rate 4 cents and they also added a 5 cents recallable nickel increase, making the total 44.6 cents of $100 assessed value. Following additional B.O.E. agenda items, the board dismissed the meeting at around 7:30 pm.

Investigation Underway after a Pike Co. Principal Threatened by a Student

An investigation is underway at a Pike Co. H.S. after the school principal was threatened. Officials with the Pike Co. school system said the incident started on Friday morning at Pike Co. Central H.S. as a teacher was giving students a writing assignment. One of the students refused to do the assignment and apparently made the statement that if he had to do it, he would write about slitting the throat of Principal David Rowe. The student was taken to the office where he made a comment that he did make the threat, that’s when the KSP was brought into question the young man.

School officials say they do believe this was an isolated case and there was never any threat to anyone else in the school. School leaders say they want to reassure all other faculty and staff as well as parents and students that their school is safe and they are performing a thorough investigation. The KSP is continuing to investigate this incident.

Arraignment Date Set for Johnson County Attorney

A Johnson County defense attorney will be able to answer to drug charges against her next month. According to WYMT, a grand jury indicted Mary Lou Chandler on three counts of drug trafficking charges last week and she was taken into custody on Thursday evening. The Johnson Co. Sheriff's Office said they had been investigating for nearly six months. The TV station said deputies also found marijuana growing on Chandler's porch, which will be used as evidence. Chandler is set to appear in court on October 3rd. She was taken to the Big Sandy Regional Detention Center following the arrest and she posted bond. Remember Chandler is innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

KSP Search for 3 Vehicles Stolen During Business Burglary

Kentucky State Police are searching for 3 vehicles that were stolen from the parking lot of a business in Harlan, during a break-in. Troopers initially responded to a break-in at Discount Pools in Harlan on September 21 and the preliminary investigation indicates that someone gained entry into the store and stole pool supplies, money and tools. Police say that while inside, the suspects allegedly stole three sets of keys that belonged to vehicles parked at Huff Auto Sales, a business which is located beside Discount Pools. Kentucky State Police are currently looking for the following vehicles: A maroon 1992, GMC 1500 pickup truck 4x4 with rust on the rear fenders, a dark red 2009 Ford Fusion, and a White 1996, Chevrolet Silverado 1500 extended cab pickup truck, with rust on a cab corner and missing a right marker light. Anyone with information about this case can contact Kentucky State Police, Post 10 Harlan at (606) 573-3131.

DEA Scheduled to hold 9th Annual Drug Take-Back Day Sept. 27

Operation UNITE along with Kentucky State Police posts throughout southern and eastern Kentucky will be participating in the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s 9th National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on Saturday, September 27. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the DEA will collect potentially dangerous expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs at KSP Post locations in Ashland, Harlan, Hazard, London, Morehead, Pikeville and Richmond. In addition, Operation UNITE accepts medications year-round at 42 dropbox sites within its service region. For a list of the permanent drop-off sites visit http://operationunite.org/investigations/med-drop-box-sites/. In the eight previous take-back days, the DEA and its state, local and tribal law enforcement and community partners have removed more than 4.1 million pounds (2,123 tons) of prescription medications from circulation. Kentucky had 1,007 overdose deaths in 2013, with five of the top six counties being in UNITE’s service region, according to the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy.

Another benefit of the drop-box program is protecting the environment. For years, the generally accepted method for disposing of old or left over medications was to flush them down the toilet. This practice, however, has been strongly discouraged because of concerns about potential health and environmental effects of antibiotics, hormones, painkillers, depressants and stimulants making their way into our water system and soil. Residents are asked to please remove all identifying labels from prescription bottles before bringing them to the drop-off sites. The National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, which began in October 2010, aims to provide a safe, convenient and responsible means of disposal, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse of these medications. For more information about Operation UNITE visit their website at www.operationunite.org<http://www.operationunite.org>.

State Political Parties Post Fundraising Totals

Kentucky's two major political parties raised close to $1 million combined in August leading up to the pivotal November elections. The Kentucky Democratic Party reported it raised more than $498,000 in August. The party that controls the state House and the governor's office has raised more than $1.3 million in 2014 and has a little over $474,000 in cash available. The Republican Party of Kentucky raised more than $455,000 in August. The party that controls the state Senate and all but one of the of the state's federal offices has raised more than $2 million in 2014 and has $2.1 million in cash available. The Nov. 4 election will determine Kentucky's U.S. Senator and which party controls the state House.

Calendar Set for General Assembly’s 2015 Session

The 2015 Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly is scheduled to begin on Jan. 6 and will last 30 legislative days. As common practice in an odd-numbered year, in which sessions are half as long as in even-numbered years, the session will have two parts. The first four days of the session is Jan. 6 to Jan. 9 and will focus on organizational work, such as electing legislative leaders, adopting rules of procedure and organizing committees. The introduction and consideration of legislation can also begin during this time. The second part of the session begins on Feb. 3, with final adjournment scheduled for March 24. Legislators will not meet in session on Feb. 16 in observance of Presidents’ Day. The veto recess – the period of time when lawmakers commonly return to their home districts while the governor considers possible vetoes – begins on March 10. Lawmakers will return to the Capitol on March 23 and 24 for the final two days of the session.

State Urges Propane Users to Plan Now for Winter

The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet issued a release on Monday asking propane customers to prepare for winter. “The most effective short-term actions that suppliers and customers can take are to participate in fall fill programs,” said EEC Secretary Len Peters. “Weather is a dominant influence in the demand for propane — colder-than-normal winters both increase demand and negatively impact deliverability. Current weather forecasts indicate that we’ll experience another strong winter for the region and we want to make sure customers are prepared.” Secretary Peters also recommended that homeowners seal and insulate their homes for increased efficiency and comfort in both winter and summer.

The issue is not supply but getting the propane to where it is needed. “Propane production has increased significantly; the problem is bottlenecks due to lack of adequate storage and transportation infrastructure. The EEC strongly urges consumers to:

1. Fill storage tanks now, before the cold weather hits. Many dealers have pre-buy or summer fill programs that encourage customers to top-off before the high-demand season starts.

2. Sign up for automatic delivery rather than being a “will call” customer. This allows dealers to better schedule delivery trucks and helps ensure that the customer won’t run out of propane.

3. Sign up for budget payment plans. This helps the customer spread the payments for propane over several months.

4. Monitor your tank. Know how much you have left in the tank. Unless your dealer requests otherwise, call when the level hits 25 percent. This will allow your dealer to schedule you for a refill in a timely manner.

5. Have a professional perform tune-ups/maintenance on equipment and appliances to increase fuel efficiency.

For tips on home weatherization and energy efficiency visit the Cabinet’s energy website at energy.ky.gov. For more information from the propane industry, talk with your local propane dealer or visit propanecomfort.com.

Local News 9-22-2014


Sheldon Clark H.S. Locked Down Friday after Bullet Found in Bathroom

Reports swirled all around Martin Co. Friday that Sheldon Clark H.S was locked down after school officials found a bullet in a boy’s bathroom. According to the Martin County Sheriff’s Office, they said the one bullet was an “assault style" and was found after school got underway Friday. The KSP was also called to this scene and began their investigation by reviewing security cameras, as well as interviewing students.

Martin County Superintendent Steve Meadows told WSAZ that "We have identified the person that brought the bullet in, and we feel confident now that we've brought some closure to how this unspent ammunition got into our building. The school remained on lock down until around 1:45 p.m. Friday, and parents were allowed to pick up their children. There has been no further information released at this time, but superintendent Meadows said there will be a public forum held this week to discuss the procedures and also to answer any questions the public might have. The KSP and the Martin Co. Sheriff’s Office is continuing to investigate this incident.

Knott County School Locked Down During Police Chase

Another Eastern Ky school was also locked down Friday after the Kentucky State Police searched for a man, who ran from them after a traffic stop in Perry County. Reports indicate that troopers responded to the Holly Hills Shopping Center in Perry Co after they received a tip of the whereabouts of a man that ran from them following a traffic stop. KSP said they heard shots fired coming from in the same vicinity of the shopping center, but that turned out to be a hunter in the woods close by. Police said the suspect r an in the direction of Carr Creek Elementary, which was placed on lock down as precaution, until police gave the ok. Turns out the man was never located and police are continuing to look for him. No one was injured during this chase or lock down.

Former Ambulance Service Director Sentenced for Theft

A former director of a now closed Pike Co. Ambulance Service, has been sentenced to 3 years in prison after she pleaded guilty to stealing from that company. The ambulance service suspended its operations earlier this, blaming the closure on the theft of tens of thousands of dollars by former director Mary Morton, 47, of Ashcamp. Morton had pleaded guilty to the charges of theft and forgery. Investigators and prosecutors estimate Morton stole at least $68,000 from the ambulance service, but they don't know the exact amount. Morton was booked into the Pike County Detention Center after she was sentenced.

Three Arrested in Kidnapping Case in Ashland, Ky

Three men have been arrested in Boyd Co. after authorities say the men, were involved in a kidnapping case Friday. Police say the incident took place on about 4:30 p.m., Friday at the Shell Station on Greenup Avenue in Ashland. Police reports indicate that one of the suspects thought the victim had stolen something from him; so he chased him inside the store, dragged him outside and threw him in a car then he drove off. Dashawn Miller, Kenneth Thielke and Raymond Johnson were found at a motel just a few block away by Police and were arrested on sight. The victim was also found at the hotel and was rescued. All three men are now facing kidnapping charges and are being held in the Boyd County Detention Center. Ashland Police are continuing to investigate this incident.

Breathitt Co. Pair Face Child Endangerment Charges

According to the KSP, a Breathitt County man and woman are facing child endangerment charges, following a call concerning two people in a heated argument at a home along Kentucky 378. When troopers arrived at the scene, they found Rachel Fugate and Harold Kilburn drunk and yelling at one another outside. Three small children were found inside the residence and troopers said the pair was too intoxicated to be caring for the kids. Both now face endangering the welfare of a minor charges.

Public Meeting today at 5 p.m. at the Johnson Co. BOE over Tax Rate

The Johnson County Board of Education will be holding a public meeting today at 5 PM concerning a proposed tax rate. Johnson County Schools' rate right now is 36.9 cents for every hundred dollars of assessed property. The proposal on the table would push that rate up to 56.6 cents. School officials say this new rate is needed to help generate an additional 1.2 million dollars of revenue for the school, to help offset reduced state funding. Again the public meeting will take place today (Monday) at 5 p.m. at the Board of Education main office. The community is encouraged to attend.

Census Bureau Report Shows Slight Improvement in KY Poverty Rate

FRANKFORT, Ky. - The latest Census Bureau report shows an improving economy in 2013 but some experts caution the recovery is too slow to help the living standards of many middle and low-income Americans. In Kentucky, 18.8 percent of the people lived in poverty last year. That's down from 19.4 percent in 2012. Jason Bailey, director of the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy, says too many people are still struggling to afford the basics. "Paying for housing, paying for transportation, paying for child care, being able to go back to school and get the education you need, all of these things are very difficult," says Bailey. Nationwide, the poverty rate was at 14.5 percent last year, more than four full percentage points lower than in Kentucky.

The census report also shows a substantial decline in child poverty nationwide dropping from nearly 22 percent in 2012 to below 20 percent last year. Robert Greenstein is president of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. "The census data indicate that the child poverty drop in 2013 was driven largely by a rise in employment and earnings among parents," Greenstein says. But, in Kentucky more than a quarter of the children, 25.3 percent, lived in poverty last year. The Census report prompted Kentucky Youth Advocates to renew its call for a state Earned Income Tax Credit. The advocacy group says that would allow working families to keep more of their income which could be "a first-step solution to move kids out of poverty."

Bailey says increasing the state's minimum wage is another way to enhance economic security for the working poor. "The minimum wage has lost about one fourth of its value because it's not been kept over the years, it's not been increased to keep up with inflation," he says. While Bailey calls it a "no brainer" to increase the minimum from $7.25 an hour to $10.10, the conservative think tank, Bluegrass Institute, disagrees. In the words of economist Dr. Eric Schansberg, who is on the institute's Board of Scholars, "The minimum wage makes it more expensive to hire people," he says.

Voting Registration Deadline Looms for November General Election

In anticipation of the November 4th General Election, politicians are reminding Kentuckians of the voting registration deadline. County Clerks' Offices will accept voter registration cards until the close of business on Monday, October 6th. Mail-in voter registration applications must be postmarked by that date. Before registering, there are some rules to remember. To be eligible to vote, you have to have lived in Kentucky for at least 28 days before election day. You cannot be a convicted felon or have the right to vote anywhere outside Kentucky.

Local News 9-19-2014


Johnson Co. Defense Attorney Arrested for Drugs

A Johnson Co. defense attorney is in a bit of trouble following her arrest Thursday afternoon on drug charges. According to WYMT, the Johnson Co. Sheriff’s office arrested Mary Lou Chandler, 63 of Paintsville, after she was indicted on three counts of drug trafficking. Sheriff Dwayne Price said his office had been conducting an investigation for the past six months that led to Thursday’s arrest. Reports indicate deputies found marijuana plants at Chandler’s home and saved them as evidence. Chandler has been practicing law in this area for at least 35 years. She was taken to the Big Sandy Regional Detention Center. The JCSO is continuing to investigate this incident.

Louisa Man Sentenced in Sexual Assault Case

A Lawrence Co. man could be facing up to three decades in prison after he admitted guilt in a sexual assault case involving a 14-year-old girl. According to the commonwealth attorney's office, Harold Shannon, 67, of Louisa, pled guilty to second-degree sodomy and unlawful transaction with a minor. State Police arrested Shannon on June 12 and charged him with 5 counts of Use of a Minor (under 16) in a Sex Performance, 5 counts of Unlawful Transaction with a minor– Illegal Sex Acts victim under 16, one count of Promoting a Minor Under 16 in Sex Performance and 1 count of Possess/View Matter Portraying Sexual Performance by Minor. Shannon is being held in the Big Sandy Detention Center and will be sentenced next month. He faces 35 years behind bars.           

Child Charged after Hand-Written Threat Found at Greenup Co. School

According to the Kentucky State Police in Ashland, an 11-year-old boy has been charged with terroristic threatening after a hand-written threat was found at a Greenup County school. This is the second threat at the Greenup County schools this week, but the two threats are not related. The latest threat was found at an elementary school Thursday, according to KSP. Investigators say the school was evacuated and crews did a sweep of the building, but no evidence of a threat was found. They were able to track the threat to an 11-year-old boy, who was charged with terroristic threatening.

Kentucky Nears Full Job Recovery from Recession

A state economist says Kentucky is on pace in the coming months to fully regain all the jobs lost during the Great Recession. Economist Monoj Shanker said Thursday that Kentucky has regained 96 percent of the 122,100 jobs that were shed as a result of the deep economic downturn, and that a full pre-recession recovery is expected by year's end.Shanker says nonfarm employment in Kentucky totaled 1,865,800 in August, up by 24,000 positions from a year ago. Last month's total is 4,800 jobs away from reaching the state's peak employment in January 2008 before job losses began mounting during the recession. The state says last month's jobless rate in Kentucky dropped to 7.1 percent, down 1.3 percent from a year ago. Kentucky's unemployment rate remains above the national rate.     

First Flights Scheduled for New Regional Airport in Pikeville

A long awaited regional airport finally has a date to open up for business. That first daily flight is set to depart Pikeville on October 27 at about 6:30 in the morning by Appalachian Air and will be flying Nashville, TN. Luke Schmidt, a consultant who has worked on getting commercial flights in Pikeville says he believes this will be a viable operation because research indicated a number of travelers in Eastern Kentucky who went to other airports farther away than Pikeville for air service.

Public Invited to Comment on Mountain Parkway Expansion

Citizens are invited to learn more about two alternatives for improving the Mountain Parkway in Wolfe County at a meeting next week. Engineers with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and its consultants will seek input on the alternatives to widen the parkway to four lanes and improve interchanges. The event also will offer an overview of the 46-mile expansion project. The event will take place from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 23 at Campton Elementary School, 166 Highway 2491, Campton, Ky.

The Mountain Parkway Expansion, proposed by Governor Beshear and funded by the Kentucky General Assembly, will close the only gap in a 400-mile, four-lane, high-speed corridor for commerce and mobility across Kentucky from Pikeville to Paducah. The 46-mile project will widen 30 miles of the existing parkway from two lanes to four lanes, and will extend the parkway another 16 miles by widening KY 114 from outside Salyersville to Prestonsburg. The entire Mountain Parkway Expansion, which is expected to be completed in six to 10 years, has a preliminary price tag of $753 million. For more information visit the project website, http://www.MtnParkway.com.

Local Walkers to Raise Money for Diabetes Research

Everyone is invited to come out to Big Sandy Community and Technical College in Prestonsburg, on Saturday, September 27th in support of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Big Sandy South Walk to Cure Diabetes. Local corporations, families, schools, and other organizations are encouraged to take part in this third annual walk event. The Kentucky Chapter of Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) aims to raise more than $50,000 for research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes and its complications. Each of the previous two walks have brought more than 500 participants and raised over $20,000 per event. Entire families from kids to grandparents take part in this fundraising effort, many of whom are a part of the four million Americans affected by or have a connection to type 1 (or juvenile) diabetes.

The Big Sandy South Walk is sponsored this year in part by Walters Toyota, Pig in a Poke, and Moe’s of Ashland, and will feature a kids’ activities tent, with inflatables by East Kentucky Inflatables, music entertainment by Justin Stephens, and also Scot Robinson/Casino, Sanofi A1c Champions, various other diabetes care and supply vendor tables, magical entertainment by Pixie Dusted Parties, and local radio and television station live event coverage. A post-walk lunch will be provided by Moe’s of Ashland and Penn Station of Pikeville. On-site registration begins at 10:30 a.m., and the Walk around the BSCTCS trail will start at 11:30. You may register to participate for the Kentucky walk held in Prestonsburg by going to the following website: http://www2.jdrf.org/site/TR/Walk/Chapter-Kentucky4233?fr_id=3955&pg=entry

JDRF is a leader in setting the agenda for diabetes research worldwide, and is the largest charitable funder and advocate of type 1 diabetes research. Since its origination in 1970, the mission of JDRF has been constant: to find a cure for diabetes and its complications through the support of research. To register now and participate, sponsor the event, build a Walk team, or for more information please call the JDRF Kentucky Chapter at 866-485-9397 for more info, or locally, Paula Fairchild, JDRF walk chair, 606-369-5929.

Local News 9-18-2014

 

Burglars Caught Stealing from a Magoffin Co. Home

According to the Kentucky State Police, a Magoffin Co. man caught two men attempting to burglarize a home recently. Police say Lawrence Hale seen the pair had backed their car up to the rear of his home, with the trunk up. The home was located on Straight Fork Road in Magoffin Co. Police say when Hale approached the men, they took off running, however, one of the men, Jammie Risner returned to the home to say he had nothing to do with the theft. Troopers arrested Risner and he faces a burglary charge. No owrd on the other man at this time. Lawrence Hale told police that he found one of his shotguns in the trunk of the car, as well as a TV sitting outside the home. No other information has been released at this time.

Three Lawrence CO. Men facing Burglary Charges

The Lawrence Co. Sheriff’s Office have arrested three men on burglary charges. Sheriff Garret Roberts said his deputies arrested Brandon Birt, John Oliver, and Joshua Triplett Tuesday night. Reports say the three men broke into the home of Triplett's parents and while inside, stole about 70 pounds of yellow root and then sold it. All three men now are facing second degree burglary charges and Birt also faces a possession of marijuana charge. The LCSO is continuing to investigate this incident.

Second Person Dies from Injuries in a Five Vehicle Crash in Pike Co.

Here’s another update to a story WSIP news had on from last week. A second person has died as a result from injuries she suffered in a five vehicle crash in Pike County. Officials say the accident happened on US 23 at the Island Creek intersection near Pikeville on September 8. Walter Gearhart, 58, of Pikeville, died at a local hospital about 12 hours after the accident and Kimberly Thompson, 34, of Pikeville, died Tuesday. Two other people were also hurt in this accident. Investigators said that an empty 10-wheel dump truck was traveling south when it crossed the median, flipped over on its side, and crashed into four other cars traveling in the opposite direction. Police said Gearhart and Thompson were driving two of the cars that were hit by the truck. The accident remains under investigation by the Pikeville Police Dept and the KSP.

Juvenile Arrested for Threatening Violence against Greenup Schools

According to a news release from the KSP in Ashland, on Tuesday, September 16, the Kentucky State Police began an investigation into a post made on a social media site involving the threat of violence at unknown Greenup County schools. Within 6 hours of receiving the initial report Troopers with the Kentucky State Police said they located an eleven year old female juvenile for creating the fictitious social media account and posting the threat of violence toward Greenup County Schools. The female was charged with Terroristic Threatening 1st Degree, which is a Class C Felony and is punishable by imprisonment not less than five years nor more than ten years. The Kentucky State Police is asking the public for any information related to this investigation and the possible identity of the individual on the post. Callers may remain anonymous and can call the Kentucky State Police at 606-928-6421. Local law enforcement agencies in Greenup County and the Greenup County School District are assisting with this investigation. KSP Detective Jeff Kelley is the lead investigator. Greenup Co decided to cancel classes for Wednesday because of the threats.  

Experts Discuss Bumps on Road to a Healthier KY

In the midst of sweeping health-care reform in Kentucky, hundreds of people gathered in Louisville on Tuesday to explore how to "do care differently." Dave Bolt, deputy director of the Kentucky Primary Care Association, said it's time to move away from what he calls a "treat 'em and street 'em mentality." To reshape the way care is delivered, Bolt told the crowd, a more common-sense approach is needed, putting the patient first, "and finally, to the realization that good health is an investment in the future of the Commonwealth, much as education, roads or sewer systems." Experts also touched on the topics of changes in the health-care workforce, and how changes in payment are driving the delivery of care - including a focus on prevention.

Sheila Schuster, who chairs the Advocacy Action Network, a coalition of 250 organizations, said the key to reshaping health care is collaboration. "We're not playing very well with each other in the sandbox," she said. "We spend more time and energy and money fighting with each other." In some cases, Schuster said, people who are well trained and qualified are being left out of the decision-making process about what services to deliver and how. She used certified midwives as an example, and mentioned the fact that there are no birthing centers in Kentucky. As deputy secretary of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Eric Friedlander likened the changes in health care to an "earthquake" in the past five years. Kentucky has expanded Medicaid and switched it from a fee-for-service system into managed care, and he said there's still much that has to be done differently.

"We have to look at certificate-of-need reform. We have to look at licensure reform. We have to look at workforce and workforce reform. We need to bring more services into the communities," Friedlander said. "And, the biggest thing, and what is going to be the most difficult for us all, is payment reform." Friedlander told the forum that Kentucky also has a long way to go to improve long-term care and community-based services.

Local Walkers to Raise Money for Diabetes Research

Everyone is invited to come out to Big Sandy Community and Technical College in Prestonsburg, on Saturday, September 27th in support of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Big Sandy South Walk to Cure Diabetes. Local corporations, families, schools, and other organizations are encouraged to take part in this third annual walk event. The Kentucky Chapter of Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) aims to raise more than $50,000 for research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes and its complications. Each of the previous two walks have brought more than 500 participants and raised over $20,000 per event. Entire families from kids to grandparents take part in this fundraising effort, many of whom are a part of the four million Americans affected by or have a connection to type 1 (or juvenile) diabetes.

The Big Sandy South Walk is sponsored this year in part by Walters Toyota, Pig in a Poke, and Moe’s of Ashland, and will feature a kids’ activities tent, with inflatables by East Kentucky Inflatables, music entertainment by Justin Stephens, and also Scot Robinson/Casino, Sanofi A1c Champions, various other diabetes care and supply vendor tables, magical entertainment by Pixie Dusted Parties, and local radio and television station live event coverage. A post-walk lunch will be provided by Moe’s of Ashland and Penn Station of Pikeville. On-site registration begins at 10:30 a.m., and the Walk around the BSCTCS trail will start at 11:30. You may register to participate for the Kentucky walk held in Prestonsburg by going to the following website: http://www2.jdrf.org/site/TR/Walk/Chapter-Kentucky4233?fr_id=3955&pg=entry

JDRF is a leader in setting the agenda for diabetes research worldwide, and is the largest charitable funder and advocate of type 1 diabetes research. Since its origination in 1970, the mission of JDRF has been constant: to find a cure for diabetes and its complications through the support of research. To register now and participate, sponsor the event, build a Walk team, or for more information please call the JDRF Kentucky Chapter at 866-485-9397 for more info, or locally, Paula Fairchild, JDRF walk chair, 606-369-5929.

 

Local News 9-17-2014

 

           

Man Facing Assault Charge in Martin Co.

A Martin County man is facing an assault charge for shooting another man in the face. According to the Martin Co. Sheriff’s Dept. the incident took place on Saturday. Reports say Sheriff Deputies arrested Larry Mills, who told them the victim, whose name has not been released, allegedly stole $20 and a pack of cigarettes from him. Mills went on to say that when he tried to confront the man, he was jumped and went home to get his 22 revolver. When he returned, he told deputies that he raised the gun, but his father in law grabbed him and caused the gun to go off. Officials say the victim suffered wounds to his face and neck. The Martin Co. Sheriff’s Office is continuing to investigate this incident and no further information has been made available at this time.

Carter Co. Man Pleads Guilty to Variety of Charges, Including Sodomy

According to a news release from the KSP, on Tuesday, September 16, Matthew Morrison entered a Guilty Plea in Carter Circuit Court to Sodomy 1st Degree, Trafficking in Controlled Substance 1st Degree and official Misconduct. KSP investigators say they received a complaint from a woman to whom Morrison was supposed to serve an arrest warrant on, who said she was forced into sexual acts with Morrison in exchange for not serving the warrant while he was a member of the Carter Co. Sheriff’s office. KSP added that Morrison had also been involved in several illegal exchanges of pills. He was fired from the sheriff’s office on Feb. 8.

The Sodomy charges were amended to Official Misconduct and Morrison received 12 months in jail. The controlled substance charge was amended to Tampering with Physical Evidence and he received 5 years in jail and on the official Misconduct charge, he received 12 months in jail. The sentences will run concurrently, with Morrison being on supervised probation for 5 years. As part of Morrison’s plea agreement, he also agreed not to seek nor accept employment with any law enforcement agency again.

Former State Worker Fined For Mistreating Women

A former assistant director of the Department of Fish and Wildlife was fined and reprimanded Monday for mistreating women as the Executive Branch Ethics Commission wrapped up a two-year investigation of the agency. Kenneth "Scott" King used his position "to create an oppressive and hostile atmosphere" by telling his female employees what parts of their body he and other male supervisors preferred, according to a news release from the ethics commission. King allegedly told some female employees to wear short skirts and high heels to meetings in order to get what they wanted and, in one case, told a female employee to show him her breasts.

King did not admit he did those things, but he did not contest them either, "recognizing that the evidence against him indicates" he committed them, according to a settlement agreement. He did admit to having the department fix a state-owned tractor that he broke while using it to improve some land he used for hunting. The commission fined King $2,750 and publicly reprimanded him. A call to King's attorney was not immediately returned. King is the eighth current or former Fish and Wildlife employee to be fined since January, according to John Steffen, the Ethics Commission's executive director. Altogether, Fish and Wildlife employees have paid or agreed to pay $21,449 in fines. Gil Lawson, a spokesman for the cabinet agency that includes Fish and Wildlife, declined to comment.

UPike Receives $2.2M to Create a Student Success Center

The University of Pikeville has been awarded $2.2 million to create a center for student success. The grant came from the US Department of Education as part of the Title III Strengthening Institutions Program. UPIKE President James Hurley said the grant would be used to create a center for student success with a centralized approach to advising, tracking and supporting first-year students. Hurley says they are eager to expand services they offer their students and this will help them be able to give individual attention to every first-year student. "We will continue to enhance our campus-wide efforts to improve retention and persistence, and ultimately graduate more students," said Hurley. There are 2,400 students enrolled at UPike for the fall semester, a record enrollment number.

Calls for More Funding on Childhood Cancer

LEXINGTON, Ky. - September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, and Jamie Ennis Bloyd is, as she puts it, a "mom on a mission." Bloyd's five-year-old son Paxton has a rare form of lymphoma called sporadic type Burkitt's lymphoma. The Lexington mother says it's unacceptable that less than four percent of all cancer research is focused on pediatric cancer. "Kids are 100 percent of our future. Four percent is not enough for a population that holds all of the promise for everything, for our whole world," she says. "It's just not okay with me. Children are precious. They haven't done anything to deserve this." The American Cancer Society is urging that more resources be dedicated to caring for the overall well-being of child cancer patients and their families. While Bloyd understands the value of palliative care, she believes dollars for research should come first.

The American Cancer Society's Rebecca Kirch says that extra layer of support is critical because research shows two-thirds of childhood cancer survivors endure debilitating symptoms that can continue into adulthood, and even last a lifetime. "As we've seen more and more children surviving and growing into adulthood, it's not without the expense of this impact on these other things," she says. Kirch notes more focus is being placed on trying to limit the severe side effects of treating pediatric cancer. Bloyd's son Paxton is now on his eighth and final round of chemotherapy. She says his scans and biopsies are clear, but she had to "beg and plead" with her son's physicians to follow up on her son's lymph node. Her message to other parents - childhood cancer symptoms usually don't "roar out at you." "Things that can easily be written off as like, 'Oh that's just a four-year-old being a four-year-old, or a five-year-old being a five-year-old, going through a phase not wanting to eat,'" explains Bloyd. "Or, 'oh well, he just ran around and ate too much and has got a belly ache.' Or, you know, 'It's growing pains, that's why his legs hurt.'" From her own experience, Bloyd tells parents - don't be afraid to ask questions and "push, push and push again."